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The most common productivity advice is to begin with the easiest tasks first and then move to the more difficult ones. This is to help create momentum to push us to become more productive.

But is it really the most productive way of tackling our to-do list? In this video, I explore what productivity experts are saying and why doing what is contrary to the commonly held advice might lead to better productivity.

People tackle different types of tasks every day. Some tasks are more important than others. People make decisions on what tasks to tackle first in their daily to-do list. Some tasks are easily accomplished, and some are more complex and take a bit more time.

As we go through this list, we make the very conscious decision on how to prioritize the tasks so that we can get as much done as possible. The goal is not to appear busy—the goal is to be productive and to get as many tasks ticked off the list as possible.

The question now is, what is better for productivity? Do we tackle the easy tasks first, then proceed with the more difficult, more complex ones later? The short answer, according to productivity experts, is to address what is difficult first. Doing so is better for the long term.

Now you might ask: if the goal is get as much done as possible, why tackle what takes a long time to do? Let’s take this step by step.

We already know that tasks aren’t created equal. If we go by the urgent-important matrix, more commonly known as the Eisenhower Decision Matrix, there are 4 kinds of tasks.

  1. Tasks that are both important and urgent
  2. Tasks that are important, but not urgent
  3. Tasks that are not important, but are urgent
  4. Tasks that are neither important nor urgent

How do we prioritize these tasks?

Productivity experts say that if the task is …

  1. … neither important nor urgent, you should stay away because these are distractions.
  2. … not important, but urgent, you should delegate to someone else.
  3. … important, but not urgent, you should do this later.
  4. … important and urgent, you should do this immediately.

To understand why we should focus on the difficult tasks first over the easy ones lies in understanding the last two tasks. Important but not urgent tasks are usually tasked long-term tasks, while the important and urgent tasks are short term tasks.

However, we also need to be mindful that some tasks become urgent today because we didn’t plan out for or didn’t accomplish them yesterday or last week or last month or even last year, when they were clearly not urgent.

The problem with prioritizing urgent tasks today is it makes us more reactive, than proactive. I will acknowledge that there are some factors that are out of our control that contributes to the urgency of some tasks, and so we need to focus on these urgent and important tasks immediately. But the context of our discussion is on the important tasks that we have set aside because they were not yet urgent at that time and because they were probably difficult and complex that we decided to put it off for another day.

Why do we do this? Why do we favour the easy over the difficult?

We tackle them first because they are easy and getting these tasks out of the way gives us a sense of accomplishment—we get more done in half the time. The problem is when we hide behind these tasks because we are procrastinating on the more important and more complex tasks—focusing on the easy tasks now become counterintuitive. We think we’re accomplishing more, but it takes time away from tackling what truly matters.

If you feel that this is you, you are not alone. A lot of us do this for many reasons. One significant reason why we put off the difficult but important tasks is that it takes us more time to do, and we’re more likely to make mistakes in the process vis-à-vis doing what is easy.

So what should we do?

The first thing we need to keep in mind is to focus on what is important. You don’t necessarily need to ALWAYS choose the difficult over the easy—but you need to be conscious about what is important for you and your business both in the short term and in the long term. Then find a balance so that you can address both needs.

You also need to change our mindset about how much time it takes to finish a difficult task. Yes, it takes more time than usual. Yes, we’re likely to make a mistake or two (or even more). But don’t think of that extra time as a wasted resource. Think of it as our time investment towards learning the task. Mistakes are great teachers—and if we learn our lessons well, then we’re likely to do better as we progress in the task.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

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With many of us encouraged to stay home in this new normal, Daymond John of Shark Tank urges everyone to "take the time to reinvest in yourself" while working from home. In this video, I explore what you can do at home to reinvest in yourself.

In the beginning of the global pandemic, governments around the world introduced community quarantines and lockdowns to help contain the spread. Activities were limited to just essentials: picking up supplies, outdoor exercising with stringent social distancing rules, essential work and operations, and emergencies. In some places, the spread has been largely contained, and this has led to the easing of quarantine and lockdown measures.

Nevertheless, things seem far from normal. In fact, many experts claim that the pandemic has introduced a “new” normal that we are likely to live within at least the next year or so.

With many of us encouraged to stay home in this new normal, we have found an abundance of time. Time saved from fetching our children from school, commuting to and from work, even from going out for social events. Some of us have utilised this time to sleep in, to rediscover what cooking is like in the kitchen, and some of us have discovered the joy of Netflix.

However, I would like to encourage you to explore what you can do at home to invest in yourself. There are many good reasons to explore learning at this time. In the short term, and particularly during this time, learning may help our mental health.

As discussed in a previous video, exercising your brain puts you in a position of being in control and lessens feelings of helplessness. In the long term, lifelong learning helps you be a better business owner, a better boss, and a better person overall, as I discuss in a previous video on how being committed to lifelong learning makes you a better business leader.

Before I begin the discussion on ways that you can invest in yourself, I’d like to introduce a caveat. Productivity experts say that this is a good time to explore learning options when you can. The pandemic is a good time to explore learning options when you can. Let’s acknowledge that some people are weathering the pandemic better than others—and self-investment has many forms. This is why this discussion about investing in yourself is not limited to just learning options.

So how can we invest in ourselves during this pandemic? Here are three things that you can start with today:

(1) Take online classes or read books

There are several being offered online. Other workshops and seminars have also been converted into online classes. There are also courses that are offered for free, such as those offered here and here. Many of these courses are also offered by Ivy League School professors in the United States.

If you can’t take classes right now, maybe you can start reading a book. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger are all voracious readers—and they all associate reading to their success in business. This is the perfect time to read a book or books that you’ve always wanted to but never had the time for. If you need more books to read, here’s a link to some free ebooks.

One of the leading advantages of online learning is how it benefits careers and businesses. Many of those who have taken certification courses online have enjoyed career advantages and professional benefits as a result of taking these courses. Online courses improve knowledge and develop technical skills—and because many of these online courses provide certification at the end and gives the impression that you are committed to learning and development.

The upside is that you take these online courses at your own pace and right in the comfort of your home. No commutes, no fixed schedules, and all at your convenience. Many of these are short enough to only take up a couple of weeks at a time, with a time investment of an hour or so per week.

If you’re worried about the cost, many courses online can be accessed for free, but the downside is that sometimes you don’t get the certification. However, if you find the online course to be relevant and of great interest to you, you can always upgrade to a paid access at any point of the course. This gives you the full experience and certification at the end. All that is required from you to begin is go online and sign up.

Personally, I have found that by paying for courses, I tend to be more committed to completing it as I have invested my own funds into it. It also forces me to choose the courses I take carefully. And who benefits from this? I do! You, too, can benefit from following this strategy, too.

(2) Connect with your community

Most events, including networking events, have been cancelled or postponed. Many of them are moving online. Maybe your community has already organised one—or perhaps you can create one and build your own community.

You can set up a Facebook Group and invite the people you know to join—and then maybe, you can also ask them to invite people in their own network to join. Let’s use technology to network and connect with people.

Remember, in business, it’s not just what you know but who you know that matters. The people you meet in these virtual groups may eventually become your suppliers, your clients, or even your partners. They may be people who can provide you with assistance and support—and vice versa.

If you are interested to know more about online networking groups, send me an email, and I’ll share with you what I have.

We don’t know how this new normal will pan out in the next few months or years—anything is possible, and so we take every opportunity that we can to adapt and move ahead.

(3) Invest in your well-being

Remember, when I said that there are many ways of investing in yourself? This is what I mean.

You do not have to push yourself when you feel overwhelmed during this period. While it may seem like a very conducive time to learn a new skill for many, your own circumstances may be different from others. We are in a global pandemic. Maybe you've been working hard all of these years, and you never had the time to focus on yourself. Reinvesting in yourself may mean something else—such as taking this time to rest and focus on your own health, physical, mental, or otherwise.

Quarantine rules encourage exercising--so maybe stepping out for a quick walk or run will do wonders for your health. Many successful entrepreneurs put a priority on their health and block time for exercise in their daily schedules. A healthy body nurtures a healthy and sound mind.

Some people have also started journaling. Journaling has been proven to be beneficial for your mental health as you start to describe how you feel in words, and many experts have said that journaling helps manage our worries and anxieties during crises. From a pragmatic point of view, journaling allows us to put our ideas down. Who knows, maybe you'll find inspiration for your next entrepreneurial venture by journaling and putting ideas down to paper.

Many have said that this pandemic has allowed people to focus more on what matters, because it has taken away the many distractions that would normally clutter our day. Maybe it is time for many of us to focus on ourselves, whether that means investing our time to educate ourselves, connect with the people that matter, or to take care of our physical and mental health. Maybe we need to do just that.

Thank you and keep safe.

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Many around the world and in our country are experiencing the effects of this public health crisis. Economic experts are sounding a grim warning of how this pandemic can affect all businesses.

What can we do, as a small business, to counter the impact of this crisis on the economy? In this video, I explore how we can proactively respond to the impending effects of this crisis. My goal is to encourage everyone to start having this conversation today and begin finding answers to the question: How can a small business owner respond to the effects of this crisis and support each other in these uncertain times?

As of this video’s recording, there are hundreds of thousands of reported cases of COVID-19. Many health experts are comparing this crisis to the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak in 2003. At that time, Australia was not severely affected as we only had 6 reported cases and no fatalities. Many of us have not experienced a crisis of this scale in our lifetime, and we, as Australian businesses, are treading unchartered waters.

We’re feeling the impact of the coronavirus in the world economy, as many nations are closing or have closed their borders to mitigate contagion risks. Businesses have shut down by order of the government and hundreds of thousands of people are now unemployed seemingly overnight. Even if many of these businesses have shut down, quite a few of them have chosen to retain their presence online.

If your business is still trading, you still have the opportunity to adapt to the current environment. That, in turn, puts you in a position to prepare for recovery once this crisis is over. Just as it did in 2003 during the SARS crisis, this crisis will also pass. Your business just needs to be in a position to take advantage of that.

If this is the time to be proactive, what can we start doing today?

Communicate with your clients

Everyone is likely to be feeling the effects of this health crisis—some more than others. This is the best time to get in touch with your clients to see how they are faring today. Acknowledge that times are tough and empathise with their current situation.

Let them know what you are doing today to help mitigate or minimise the risks. For example, if you run a restaurant or any food-related business, show your customers how you are protecting your own staff and what new measures you’re putting in place to stop the spread of the virus. Show them how you are adapting to do home delivery and how you can assist those in isolation by preparing meals for them over the next two weeks. Give them options on how, by purchasing from you, can introduce a variety in their lives by providing food options.

Communicate to your clients if you need to limit your operations or if stock becomes low in supply. How can they get in touch with you? Did you change your operating hours? What services and products are you still offering? Reassure your customers by consistently and  constantly communicating, especially when there are changes that will affect them significantly.

Use technology, explore alternatives

They call this the age of social distancing. Social distancing means deliberately increasing the physical space between people to avoid spreading illness. A recommended space of a meter or more between individuals is recommended to stop the spread of the virus. This is the reason why, in many parts of the world, large events like concerts, conferences, and shows are being cancelled to discourage the mass gathering of people.

The current recommendation is to stay home and avoid crowds—to practice self-quarantine at home and socially distance yourself from others. This means not participating in face-to-face meetings or events.

If you need to meet with someone or work with a group of people, what can you do? It’s time to use technology and explore the alternatives. There’s always email. There’s also video conferencing applications for messaging and voice calls. If you have to call off a face-to-face meeting, you can set up a video conference call through Skype, Google Hangout, or Zoom. If in case you need to work from home, you can still track team tasks and projects virtually through productivity tools such as Monday, Asana, and Trello.

There are many apps available in the market today—some have free features, while other features are available at a fee. If you’ve always wanted to learn something new and explore these apps—now is the time to do so.

Here are some examples of what people are doing across the globe in response to the call for social distancing:

  • In some places like the United States, governments are partially shutting down restaurants to discourage people gathering in large groups in a single dining space. Restaurants are keeping their kitchens open by encouraging people to order for takeout, curbside pickup, or delivery.
  • Many international conferences have also been cancelled. Organisers are instead holding virtual conferences, where people can still participate by logging in online.
  • Many companies are encouraging staff to work from home and are using many communication and productivity apps that I have mentioned to catch up and keep track of progress.
  • The entertainment industry is one of the hardest hit by the coronavirus. Many concerts and music festivals have been called off. As an alternative, many artists have gone to social media, such as Instagram and Facebook to hold live virtual concerts.
  • Other professionals—chefs, marketing professionals—are offering free virtual workshops.

Necessity is the mother of invention. There is a need today to rethink traditional business models to fit the conditions of this crisis. Those who can adapt are in a better position to overcome the challenges. This is the time to get those creative juices going and to revisit your business plans. Who knows? Your creativity might lead you to a business model that will bring you and propel your business to growth after this crisis is over.

Explore what loans and benefits are being made available to you

The government has just announced a stimulus package for the Australian economy, which provides support for small businesses, amongst many others who will be or are already being affected by the pandemic. Contact your accountant and explore what is being made available to your company and how that would impact you directly.

  1. Prepare, prepare, prepare

As business owners, we understand risks and that we should always be prepared for what is inevitable. Now is the time to think about what you should do for your business to survive. If what other people are doing is any indication of what we can do, there is a LOT that we can do today to prepare our business for the future.

I will share with you a series of questions that will likely take some time for you to think about. The answers that you come up with may be the answer that allows your business to survive and put you in a position for growth once this crisis is over.

  • What can I do now so that I can reach my customers and touch base with them?
  • What alternatives do I have so that I can continue to offer the products and services to my customers?
  • What do my customers need now?
  • Has the crisis developed new pain points for my customers?
  • What changes can I do today to support my customers’ needs and address their new pain points?

The last question is particularly important because this is how you strengthen your relationship with your customers in this time of need. For example, some grocery and supermarket chains in Australia have come up with special shopping hours to a niche market—in this case, a Senior-Only shopping hour to help older shoppers.

These are uncharted waters. We will possibly feel the economic effects of the coronavirus in the months to come. But I urge everyone to keep calm, stay safe, and focus on the things that you can change or control.

When this crisis is over, I anticipate that more business will be more open to using video conferencing and that it will be widely accepted as the main way of doing business than ever before. How will that affect your business? Let’s focus on what changes we can make and find ways to support one another.

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Entrepreneurs like Simon Sinek and Sara Blakely have repeated said to begin with your WHY.

Do you know your why? In this video, I explore what determines our WHY and why knowing our purpose matters in your business.

What Simon Sinek and Sara Blakely are saying is that everyone should find and focus on their purpose because knowing your purpose is a necessary step to success. The German philosopher Frederick Nietzsche once said, “He who has a why can endure any how.”

For business owners, the key to being motivated, to pursuing goals, to growing, and to never giving up is to understand our purpose.  Why are we in business? Why are we doing what we do?

When things get tough, our WHY determines whether we push forward or do something different. When we approach a fork in the road, and we find ourselves having difficulty making a decision, our WHY guides are choice.

What determines our why?

Margie Warrell explains that four (4) factors determine our WHY or PURPOSE:

  • Talents.

What is it that do we do well naturally? Do you have the innate ability to understand a problem immediately and identify its root cause? Are you a natural problem solver? Are you a natural communicator? Are you innately creative and able to provide out-of-the-box solutions for complex problems?

  • Skills & Expertise.

While talent refers to something that comes naturally to you, skills and expertise are the results of your education, training, and experience. These are things you’ve learned in formal education and training, and things you’ve mastered through repeated tasks or through your work experience.

  • Values.

Values pertain to what is important to you. What are your principles? What do you hold important, or even sacred? Your values determine what you are willing and not willing to do to achieve something.

  • Passions.

What makes you come alive? What are your interests? What brings you joy?

The intersection of these four factors will give some indication on what your WHY is. Your talents, skills, and expertise will tell you what kind of product and/or service you can provide. Your values and your passions will determine how you define your business model, your organisational structure, and how you respond to different situations in your business.

What are the more common WHYs—what motivates many entrepreneurs?

  1. Money. Perhaps the most practical WHY. Many of us are in business to be able to afford a living. And many times, more than a living. Business owners are in business to provide a lifestyle for themselves and for their family.
  2. Independence. Because we want to work for ourselves—to make decisions for ourselves and have control over what we can offer. We also want our businesses to work for us—to have the option to “not” work and have the business work for us when we’re not working in it.
  3. Lifestyle. While this why might be construed as an intersection between money and independence, I think that it is also important to point out that many of us enjoy the kind of lifestyle that being in a business provides. Having a business provides us and our families the resources and opportunities that could be challenging to do as an employee. These opportunities may include opportunities of working with certain people or privileges to do certain things, like traveling or being able to have the flexibility to be with family, that is not always as easy to do if you work 9-to-5 as an employee.
  4. Creativity. Many of us love the idea of being able to create or build something, and having a business allows us to explore our creativity.
  5. Legacy. Some people plant trees, others write a book. Entrepreneurs build businesses that they can pass on to their children and grandchildren—or a service or product that can benefit many people.
  6. Leadership. Are you a natural leader who loves motivating teams and getting them to perform at their peak? Having the opportunity to lead and motivate people is an important why for many entrepreneurs and business owners.
  7. Challenge. Some people enter competitive markets, and some people like blazing the trail and disrupting the status quo to provide better products and better solutions.

Why is UNDERSTANDING your WHY important to your business?

The short of it is because it answers a lot of questions.

If you know and understand that MONEY is your primary motivation, then this will help you determine whether your business plan, your business model, and your sales and marketing strategies are all aligned to help you make money. It will help determine whether you need to expand, develop a new product, or even downsize.

If INDEPENDENCE is your motivation, then you would be particular about how your business is structured. Will you take on a partner? If you do need a partner, which areas of the business will they be taking over, or how much say will they have in decision-making?

Or, if leaving a LEGACY is important to you, then thinking about and planning for the long-term is at the core of all of your decisions.

With these examples, it becomes clearer why we need to know and understand our WHY—and why it should matter to us. Our WHY is what we hold on to during those difficult days when we need to make important decisions, or what drives up to get out of bed each morning even when we do not feel as excited or driven—and most especially when we feel lost and confused about what to do.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >

The age-old saying is “honesty is the best policy.” Does it make business sense to be honest and transparent with your customers? Will honesty bring business success?

In this video, I explore two companies and how differently they manage the issues of honesty and transparency in business, and how this divergence led to two distinctly different outcomes.

Does it make sense to be honest and transparent with your customers? The more important question to ask, perhaps, is why is important to be transparent and honest in business? Why should businesses tell the truth all of the time?

Allow me to answer this with one example: Volkswagen.

Why is it bad business to lie to your customers?

In 2015, Volkswagen became the center of world attention when they were caught lying about what they claimed was the world’s most environmentally safe diesel engine. The media called it “Dieselgate.”

From 2008 to 2015, Volkswagen claimed that it manufactured and sold vehicles that ran on “groundbreaking clean diesel” engines. These engines supposedly met the USA’s “stringent tailpipe emissions standards.” The company marketed it as the safest diesel engine in the world.

The problem is that this is not entirely true. In fact, it was a complete lie.

The company intentionally programmed their turbocharged direct injection (TDI) diesel engines to activate their emissions controls only during laboratory emissions testing, which allowed them to mask true emissions scores to meet the safety standards. In 2015, reports confirmed that some five million Volkswagen-branded cars, 2.1 million Audi vehicles, 1.2 million Skoda automobiles and 700,000 Seat cars, as well as 1.8 million VW commercial vehicles were fitted with a defeat device in their engines.

What has Volkswagen lost by cheating?

Dieselgate was ruinous for the company. Volkswagen paid close to an estimated US$30 billion in penalties and fines. In 2015 alone, the company suffered a US$4.6 billion loss. Its share prices lost 40% immediately after the scandal.

Volkswagen lost its reputation. There was widespread distrust—from customers to car dealers. Their workforce felt demoralised. In 2017, 2 high-ranking employees were sentenced to prison.

The cost of lying is that its reputation as a trusted and reliable brand was tarnished in the mind of consumers and businesses alike. It will take a lot of marketing dollars and resources to bring the brand back to where it was before Dieselgate began.

The Volkswagen story is an extreme example of what could happen when a company is caught cheating; it provides a good lesson on why businesses should NOT lie and cheat.

What Volkswagen teaches us is that getting caught lying can be very costly to a business. They lied about the emissions and initially did not get caught. This, in turn, emboldened them to continue lying about it.

This seems part of human nature—to continue lying when one is not caught. That does not mean that one should lie in the first place. If lying is bad, does it necessarily mean that being honest is good for business?

What do companies gain when they are deliberate in being honest and transparent with their customers? Does it make good business sense to be transparent?

Let’s take a look at Patagonia.

Why does it pay to be honest?

Patagonia, a global outdoor sports brand, is an example of how being honest and transparent can have a significant and positive impact on the bottom line and brand equity. Patagonia had established itself as an ethical company that advocates environmental sustainability, workplace safety, and employee well-being long before the 2013 Bangladesh building disaster that exposed the problems of those who work in the global clothing industry.

In the 1980s, they discovered that the materials used in their clothing caused some of their retail staff to fall ill. They immediately made efforts to improve workplace conditions and to source for safer materials.

In 1996, Patagonia decided to use organic clothing in all of their clothing lines, even when it initially ate into their profits. In 2014, Patagonia partnered with Fair Trade USA. To date, the company continues to work on making every item in their clothing line fair trade.

To help customers understand where the materials of their clothing comes from, Patagonia launched an interactive website that allows consumers to trace the footprint of every product they have—essentially providing transparency to Patagonia’s supply chain.

What has Patagonia gained from this strategy?

In 2017, Patagonia was said to have earned over US$1 billion in revenue. In the same year, Patagonia was recognised at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum for producing quality clothing that doesn’t contribute to waste or the depletion of natural resources. In 2018, Patagonia was ranked No. 1 in the Social Good sector of Fast Company’s World’s Most Innovative Companies list.

Most importantly, because of its transparency strategy, Patagonia has nurtured consumer trust. In 2011, Patagonia ran their famous “Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign, urging consumers to buy less and keep their old clothing off of landfills. Surprisingly, this campaign generated a 30% increase in their sales. Patagonia believes that this is a result of consumer trust. Their consumers trust that Patagonia jackets are well-made, ethically sourced, and made of environmentally-safe material—so they would rather buy one good jacket from Patagonia that they can keep for years to come instead of buying a new jacket every year.

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario has this to say about the company’s philosophy:

You can serve the interests of your employees and do what’s right for the planet and still make great margins.”

What does this all mean for small businesses?

Let’s consider what consumers have to say about honesty and trust. According to the Edelman Trust Barometer, only 52 percent of global respondents trust businesses today. In Australia, that number goes down to 48 percent, which means that many Australians don’t trust businesses in general.

Sprout Social, a US-based social media marketing company, calls it an era of distrust. What this means is that consumers do not believe that businesses genuinely care about their customers—and that they’re merely in it for the money. Consumers, these days, have been increasingly calling for businesses to work on transparency. In fact, Sprout Social’s study shows that almost nine out of 10 Americans believe transparency from businesses is more important than ever before.

So, to answer my initial question at the beginning of this video: does it make business sense, to be honest and transparent with your customers?

If we look at Volkswagen and Patagonia, it seems that it does pay to be honest and transparent—and that lying is a bad strategy.

Being honest and transparent nurtures trust.

In Patagonia’s case, the company communicated its strategy and followed through with their actions. To be truly honest and transparent requires words and actions to match. It’s not enough to tell customers that “We are honest!”—we, as business owners, need to show them how honest and transparent we can be.

Redeem yourself by admitting fault and rectifying mistakes.

We all make mistakes. For brands and companies, what is important is to admit fault and to communicate the steps that will be undertaken to rectify these mistakes. Many brand strategists even propose that mistakes and blunders can be opportunities to gain loyalty. Sprout Social’s study supports this: 89% of respondents said business can regain their trust if it admits to making a mistake and is transparent about the steps it will take to resolve the issue.

Transparency takes effort—but it also pays.

Communicating closely with your customers may require more effort, but think of it as investing in your relationship with them.

When your company suffers a service outage and which consumers suffer from, for example, take this as an opportunity to develop a better relationship with your customers. Closely communicate with them. Explain what caused the outage. Describe the steps that you intend to take. Frequently update them about where you are in the repair progress. Service outages cause a lot of inconvenience to customers—but their irritation intensifies further when you fail to communicate about what they can expect from you.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >