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The age-old saying is “honesty is the best policy.” Does it make business sense to be honest and transparent with your customers? Will honesty bring business success?

In this video, I explore two companies and how differently they manage the issues of honesty and transparency in business, and how this divergence led to two distinctly different outcomes.

Does it make sense to be honest and transparent with your customers? The more important question to ask, perhaps, is why is important to be transparent and honest in business? Why should businesses tell the truth all of the time?

Allow me to answer this with one example: Volkswagen.

Why is it bad business to lie to your customers?

In 2015, Volkswagen became the center of world attention when they were caught lying about what they claimed was the world’s most environmentally safe diesel engine. The media called it “Dieselgate.”

From 2008 to 2015, Volkswagen claimed that it manufactured and sold vehicles that ran on “groundbreaking clean diesel” engines. These engines supposedly met the USA’s “stringent tailpipe emissions standards.” The company marketed it as the safest diesel engine in the world.

The problem is that this is not entirely true. In fact, it was a complete lie.

The company intentionally programmed their turbocharged direct injection (TDI) diesel engines to activate their emissions controls only during laboratory emissions testing, which allowed them to mask true emissions scores to meet the safety standards. In 2015, reports confirmed that some five million Volkswagen-branded cars, 2.1 million Audi vehicles, 1.2 million Skoda automobiles and 700,000 Seat cars, as well as 1.8 million VW commercial vehicles were fitted with a defeat device in their engines.

What has Volkswagen lost by cheating?

Dieselgate was ruinous for the company. Volkswagen paid close to an estimated US$30 billion in penalties and fines. In 2015 alone, the company suffered a US$4.6 billion loss. Its share prices lost 40% immediately after the scandal.

Volkswagen lost its reputation. There was widespread distrust—from customers to car dealers. Their workforce felt demoralised. In 2017, 2 high-ranking employees were sentenced to prison.

The cost of lying is that its reputation as a trusted and reliable brand was tarnished in the mind of consumers and businesses alike. It will take a lot of marketing dollars and resources to bring the brand back to where it was before Dieselgate began.

The Volkswagen story is an extreme example of what could happen when a company is caught cheating; it provides a good lesson on why businesses should NOT lie and cheat.

What Volkswagen teaches us is that getting caught lying can be very costly to a business. They lied about the emissions and initially did not get caught. This, in turn, emboldened them to continue lying about it.

This seems part of human nature—to continue lying when one is not caught. That does not mean that one should lie in the first place. If lying is bad, does it necessarily mean that being honest is good for business?

What do companies gain when they are deliberate in being honest and transparent with their customers? Does it make good business sense to be transparent?

Let’s take a look at Patagonia.

Why does it pay to be honest?

Patagonia, a global outdoor sports brand, is an example of how being honest and transparent can have a significant and positive impact on the bottom line and brand equity. Patagonia had established itself as an ethical company that advocates environmental sustainability, workplace safety, and employee well-being long before the 2013 Bangladesh building disaster that exposed the problems of those who work in the global clothing industry.

In the 1980s, they discovered that the materials used in their clothing caused some of their retail staff to fall ill. They immediately made efforts to improve workplace conditions and to source for safer materials.

In 1996, Patagonia decided to use organic clothing in all of their clothing lines, even when it initially ate into their profits. In 2014, Patagonia partnered with Fair Trade USA. To date, the company continues to work on making every item in their clothing line fair trade.

To help customers understand where the materials of their clothing comes from, Patagonia launched an interactive website that allows consumers to trace the footprint of every product they have—essentially providing transparency to Patagonia’s supply chain.

What has Patagonia gained from this strategy?

In 2017, Patagonia was said to have earned over US$1 billion in revenue. In the same year, Patagonia was recognised at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum for producing quality clothing that doesn’t contribute to waste or the depletion of natural resources. In 2018, Patagonia was ranked No. 1 in the Social Good sector of Fast Company’s World’s Most Innovative Companies list.

Most importantly, because of its transparency strategy, Patagonia has nurtured consumer trust. In 2011, Patagonia ran their famous “Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign, urging consumers to buy less and keep their old clothing off of landfills. Surprisingly, this campaign generated a 30% increase in their sales. Patagonia believes that this is a result of consumer trust. Their consumers trust that Patagonia jackets are well-made, ethically sourced, and made of environmentally-safe material—so they would rather buy one good jacket from Patagonia that they can keep for years to come instead of buying a new jacket every year.

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario has this to say about the company’s philosophy:

You can serve the interests of your employees and do what’s right for the planet and still make great margins.”

What does this all mean for small businesses?

Let’s consider what consumers have to say about honesty and trust. According to the Edelman Trust Barometer, only 52 percent of global respondents trust businesses today. In Australia, that number goes down to 48 percent, which means that many Australians don’t trust businesses in general.

Sprout Social, a US-based social media marketing company, calls it an era of distrust. What this means is that consumers do not believe that businesses genuinely care about their customers—and that they’re merely in it for the money. Consumers, these days, have been increasingly calling for businesses to work on transparency. In fact, Sprout Social’s study shows that almost nine out of 10 Americans believe transparency from businesses is more important than ever before.

So, to answer my initial question at the beginning of this video: does it make business sense, to be honest and transparent with your customers?

If we look at Volkswagen and Patagonia, it seems that it does pay to be honest and transparent—and that lying is a bad strategy.

Being honest and transparent nurtures trust.

In Patagonia’s case, the company communicated its strategy and followed through with their actions. To be truly honest and transparent requires words and actions to match. It’s not enough to tell customers that “We are honest!”—we, as business owners, need to show them how honest and transparent we can be.

Redeem yourself by admitting fault and rectifying mistakes.

We all make mistakes. For brands and companies, what is important is to admit fault and to communicate the steps that will be undertaken to rectify these mistakes. Many brand strategists even propose that mistakes and blunders can be opportunities to gain loyalty. Sprout Social’s study supports this: 89% of respondents said business can regain their trust if it admits to making a mistake and is transparent about the steps it will take to resolve the issue.

Transparency takes effort—but it also pays.

Communicating closely with your customers may require more effort, but think of it as investing in your relationship with them.

When your company suffers a service outage and which consumers suffer from, for example, take this as an opportunity to develop a better relationship with your customers. Closely communicate with them. Explain what caused the outage. Describe the steps that you intend to take. Frequently update them about where you are in the repair progress. Service outages cause a lot of inconvenience to customers—but their irritation intensifies further when you fail to communicate about what they can expect from you.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >

Do you delegate your work to others so that you can do more? Do you find delegating easy? If you find handing over control over certain tasks difficult, this video might be for you. I discuss mindsets that prevent us from delegating and how we can overcome our resistance to delegating.

Do you resist delegating things to other people? Do you like doing things yourself? Perhaps it’s time to reconsider and be more open to ‘delegation’.

Sir Richard Branson famously said, “If you really want to grow as an entrepreneur, you’ve got to learn to delegate.”

One important reason to delegate is that it frees up your resources as a business owner. Time is a very important resource—and so is mental space. When you delegate tasks to others, you are not only freeing up time but also your mental capacity to focus on the important things. When you free up your resources, you’ll have more resources to use for the most important things in your business—matters that only you, as a business owner, can do or decide on.

But why does delegating still feel so difficult? I’d like to share with you some statements that I found in my research that support the notion that delegation is difficult.

  1. I’m used to doing things myself and worry whether someone else can do these tasks the way I would do them.
  2. It will take me a lot of time and effort to train someone else before a task is done the way I do it.
  3. My business operates on a very limited budget and I may not be able to afford to employ new heads to delegate these tasks to.
  4. I love doing these things, and I do them well!

Do any of these statements apply to you?

I am not immune to the resistance to delegating, and I can identify with a few of them, especially on point number 2. I admit it, I am with everyone else on this. But how can we change this thinking? How can we shift the mindset that is preventing us from delegating work to others?

Instead of thinking about and concerning ourselves with what we will lose in the process of delegating or outsourcing—control, we focus on what we would be gaining if we let of certain tasks. Take a sheet of paper and write down the pros and cons of delegating tasks to other people.

One disadvantage of delegation is losing absolute control. It sounds like a dictatorship, doesn’t it? But it’s true! There will an increase in costs and there will be a variation in the results, which can frazzle you if you are a perfectionist.

But the advantage is less stress and increased free time, a resource you can use to focus on your business—and focus on growing your business. Your free time can be used to work on your business, rather than working in it.

Here are 4 ways to shift that mindset of giving up control into gaining time and mental space:

  1. You may think that you’re the best person to do certain tasks—and perhaps that’s true, for now. But what if you find someone who does it just as well as if not better than you? Wouldn’t that be better for the business? Instead of using your time to do all of these tasks—and using up so much mental space on so many tasks that someone else can do, why not use your time and mental energy to plan for growth, to strategise, and to execute these plans?

In my video, Your business can only grow as big as you can manage, I discuss how you—yes, you, the business owner—can be holding your business back by continuing to do everything. The reality is, the business owner alone cannot manage all of these areas singlehandedly. Your business can grow no bigger than what you can effectively manage.

What can business owners do instead? Take things off of your plate and retain only the things that will help you achieve your goals. Delegate or outsource the rest!

  • It does take time and it does take effort to train people to takeover certain tasks. Some people may need more time than you probably needed to be efficient in these tasks. But instead of thinking about it as time and effort wasted, why not shift that mindset and think of it as investing your time on something that can help free up your time in the long run? Time is not wasted when there is a return—and regaining back that time is a worthy investment!

Time is the most valuable asset—it is limited and non-renewable. In my video, Managing your business’s most important asset – your time, I provide tips on how business owners can make the best use of their time by focusing on the tasks that matter the most—the tasks that only you, the business owner, can fulfill and accomplish. What to do with the rest? Delegate, of course!

  • You don’t need to employ people full time to get help. There are many ways to get help without increasing overhead. You can hire someone part time, or hire a virtual assistant through online market places such as Upwork or Freelancer.

Outsourcing is one if the three things you can do to take your business to the next level as I explain in my video, 3 ways to improve your business today. Many times, particularly for small businesses, it makes much more sense to outsource certain areas of the operations (such as IT and database management or even payroll and bookkeeping) rather than upgrading systems or hiring new staff, which will only increase overhead costs and erode profits.

There are also many small businesses in Australia that outsource non-core operations to other businesses or professionals. For example, Whole Kids Australia (link to video forthcoming) keeps their operations small by focusing on what they are great at—and that’s marketing and product development, and delegating the rest, such as warehousing and distribution. In this way, they keep their operations small, which is their vision, without compromising on the quality of their products.

  • For any entrepreneur, time is an important asset—and so is your focus. Multitasking hurts you more than you think. In my previous video, Is multitasking hurting your business?, I share what scientific studies say about multitasking (hint: it’s not good for you!), and what you can do instead, which is to focus on the important tasks and delegate the rest!

So, think about what you can delegate and then find the resources to invest in that process. This will be the start of your continued business growth.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >

Small businesses can do big things. In this new series of videos, I would like to explore success stories of small businesses in Australia and what we can learn from them.

In this video, I share with you the story of Over The Moo ice cream.

The backstory

Over The Moo is a dairy-free ice cream business and the brainchild of entrepreneur Alex Houseman. Houseman created his business out of his own personal need. He loves ice cream but is sadly lactose intolerant. While dairy-free ice cream is available in the market, he felt that there wasn’t any product that could deliver indulgent and delicious flavor at an affordable price. This led him to develop his own dairy-free ice cream made from coconut milk.

Over The Moo is Houseman’s first business. He quickly recognised that he needed money, advice, and exposure to make it a success. He decided to seek funding in Australia’s version of Shark Tank. In the show, he received three offers but eventually walked away without a deal.

One of the concerns of the judges in Shark Tank during the Over The Moo pitch was that Houseman had not yet trademarked his recipe. Seeing the wisdom in the judges’ advice about owning his ice cream recipe, he immediately worked on fixing this intellectual property issue after the filming wrapped.

However, Houseman’s main concern with the judges’ offers were that they were lower than what he was willing to accept. It was unfortunate that the show was filmed before Over The Moo began appearing on Woolworths’ shelves. Since the judges didn’t take into consideration this particularly important business milestone, their valuation for Over The Moo was lower than Houseman’s own valuation for his business.

As of 2018, Over The Moo was available in 2200 stores, that include Cole’s, Woolworths, and IGA supermarkets. Despite a wide distribution, it maintains a lean business model of just three full-time staff.

What we can learn

1. Hard work and strategic planning pays

Houseman is a former marketing consultant, but it proved to be a difficult sell in the beginning. Houseman approached every supermarket and tried hard to convince them to carry his brand on their shelves. He started with independent supermarkets and eventually made strides toward large chains. His hard work, strategy, and very good ice cream proved to be a recipe for his current success.

Houseman said in an interview, “As I have learnt, a successful business is only one per cent good idea, and 99 per cent hard work and commitment.” This rings true for any business, but moreso for a business operating in a very competitive industry.

The ice cream business in Australia is a AU$1.1 billion industry dominated by major players such as Unilever and Baskin-Robbins. While Over The Moo is considered vegan ice cream, Houseman does not consider it as a health product as it contains the same amount of fat and sugar as a Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. This is to deliver the same indulgent flavor as regular ice cream to those with special dietary needs. Its product caters to a very specific niche: those who are lactose-intolerant or who follow a plant-based diet looking for a sweet, indulgent treat.

2. Check your cash flow

After Shark Tank, Over The Moo earned a gross profit of $1 million, but its net profit was zero. Houseman’s initial spending went to growing and expanding distribution.

Houseman confessed that he was lax with cash flow in the beginning. When he felt that this became an issue, he sought advice from other people and created an advisory board. He also took short courses on financial management. His efforts paid off.

Houseman consistenly advises having a tight watch on cash flow in his interviews. He says of his early experience with the business,

“I wish I’d known earlier how to forecast cash flow better. It’s terrible when you put all that effort into growing and promoting the business, then don’t have the cash flow to keep up.”

“At our worst, we had literally $45 in our bank account. All the while we have thousands of dollars in wages and product expenses every month. Being able to balance growth versus cash in the bank is the most important thing I have learnt regarding starting Over The Moo.'”

In my video, Allow Sales to Trump Everything, I share why cash flow management is important and how a fast growing business experiencing record sales could get into trouble if it does not manage its cash flow problems.

3. Fine-tune your product, and make sure you own it

It took Houseman 4 to 5 months of research and product development to get his ice cream recipe right. But despite doing all of the work developing the recipe, he initially shared the intellectual property of the recipes with the manufacturer he worked with. After failing to get a deal on the show and seeing that the ambiguity in the IP could become a costly issue, he immediately took the necessary steps to ensure that he had full ownership of his ice cream.

Houseman also knew how much his business was worth in his mind.  He was willing to listen to other people (i.e the Judges in Shark Tank) and was able to make an educated decision on the business value and decided not to take up their offer.  He probably knew that his product was going to go into the shelves of the major supermarkets, but could not yet reveal it to the judges at that time due to confidentiality issues.

Having said that, I have also met business owners who have inflated values of their business that were not based on market valuations. You need to be aware about the difference between your valuation of the business and how the market values your product—and you need to learn how NOT to get emotional in the process.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >

Small businesses can do big things. In this new series of videos, we will look into small businesses in Australia—their humble beginnings, their growth story, and the lessons that we can learn from them.

Today, we will look into the story of Mountain Bikes Direct and it’s unique business model that allows employees to work while pursuing their shared passion for mountain biking.

Their story

Mountain Bikes Direct is an Australian-based online business selling mountain bikes and related products, such as parts, accessories, and clothing. It considers itself as a pure play company or a company focusing merely on a specific niche—in this case, products related to mountain bikes.

However, while this 8-year-old small business caters to a specific niche in the sporting goods market, it turned over AU$10 million in annual revenue in 2018.

This is impressive considering that this online-only company operates with only 14 employees—4 of which were only added in the last year. They pride themselves with their topnotch customer service. They are not only able to supply the largest range of mountain bike parts, clothing, and accessories in Australia, but they also provide expert knowledge to their customers.

If that’s not impressive enough, consider this little tidbit: this small team rarely even sees each other. That’s because Mountain Bikes Direct does not have a central hub or office—they all work remotely, but communicate and collaborate regularly through platforms like Slack and Asana. The team resides all over Australia: the Gold Coast, the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Melbourne, Mount Beauty, Canberra, and even Colorado, USA.

Every single member of the Mountain Bikes Direct team is a mountain bike expert who continues to passionately pursue their love for mountain biking, thanks to their unique culture and work set-up. They are all required to be online and at work at a pre-determined set of hours—but beyond these hours, team members are free to pursue their hobbies and interests. They are not even required to respond to queries sent outside of their work hours.

Each team member works remotely from home and provides customer support through chat. And because they are scattered all over Australia and with one team member based out in Colorado, the team is able to provide almost round-the-clock customer service support.

What we can learn

  1. Build a business model that supports your business and life goals.

Before setting up Mountain Bikes Direct, the four founders owned and ran a brick-and-mortar mountain bike shop. They realised the limitations and challenges of operating a physical store, and so they decided to sell the physical store and focus their attention online.

While an e-commerce business provided a different set of problems and challenges, they felt that this business model allowed them to pursue their business and personal goals. For example, being a purely online store meant that they could provide a wider range of parts to customers because they do not face the challenges of keeping inventory in a limited space of a physical store.

They also don’t need to deal with overhead costs associated with running a business in a physical space. This is certainly an advantage particularly because the cycling retail industry is a highly competitive industry, as large international competitors are increasingly slashing retail prices to earn market share.

The other obvious advantage of going online-only is that it eliminated the time restrictions of running a physical store. They didn’t need to show up in a bike shop day-in, day-out to run the operations during store hours—or stay after hours to check inventory and do back office operations. They instead used the time to pursue their hobbies and passions, and it provided them with more time to be with their family.

Jen Geale, one of the co-founders, said, “Over time we realised that we wanted to focus on e-commerce for reasons both business and personal, so Michael and I took the lead on creating a new brand, Mountain Bikes Direct, that was online-only.”

  • Provide the right infrastructure to support your business model

One of the challenges of having an online-only business is the lack of face-to-face interaction with customers. In the early days of their operations, people would call their hotline just to see if there were people behind the website and to check whether they were a legitimate operation. The team quickly realised that the best way to handle these issues was through better communication.

They re-designed the website to include many trust signals and answers to frequently asked questions. They eventually took out their hotline and replaced it with live chat that allowed the team to provide a personalised and real-time response to customer queries. Best of all, they are able to serve more customers. And thanks to the different locations of their team members, there is always someone you can have a live chat with at the Mountain Bikes Direct website 17 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Geale strongly believes that their structure truly supports the business goals they are trying to achieve. She says, “Being online-only means we can offer a more comprehensive service time-wise. We can help more customers. We can help customers simultaneously. We can provide expertise between six a.m. and eleven p.m. seven nights a week.

  • Hire based on goals, and keep them motivated

To make sure that they could grow the business sustainably, the founders realised that this meant they had to build a lean team of mountain bike experts who are passionate about nurturing a mountain bike community. This means that anyone working with Mountain Bikes Direct, including its founders, should have the time to pursue their shared passion, which is exploring the great outdoors on their mountain bikes.

How can you remain an expert in mountain biking if you don’t pursue a mountain biking lifestyle? It only made sense to create and nurture a team that works in a flexible environment: a team that “gets to work hours that suit their lives.”

This unique working environment is responsible for a staff retention rate of 100% in the last couple of years. Because Mountain Bikes Direct provides a flexible working arrangement with clear guidelines on what is expected of them, team members are motivated to work.

In my video, How to motivate employees the right way, I shared how providing employees with a reasonable amount of autonomy can lead to highly motivated employees. As team members are able to pursue their passion for mountain bikes, team members are able to provide expert advice to their customers. This creates a virtuous cycle that benefits customers, motivates employees, and enables the growth of Mountain Bikes Direct.

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >

What can the judges of Shark Tank teach small business owners? It turns out, a lot. In part two of this two-part video, I share some of their best pointers, explore the wisdom behind their advice and offer tips on how we can apply their advice to our daily lives.

Shark Tank is a reality TV show that originated from the United States. Budding entrepreneurs get the chance to pitch their business ideas to investors in the panel—the so-called Sharks in the Tank.

In part 1, I explored business advice shared by the male Sharks: Robert Herjavec, Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary. In this episode, I now share wisdom from the female Sharks. Here’s what they have to say.

Lori Greiner: Do the market research yourself

Lori Greiner is an American inventor and entrepreneur. In 1996, she created and patented her first product, which was eventually picked up by a large retailer and started her entrepreneurial career. She is involved in venture capital investing, product design consulting, and television production. Her net worth stands at US$100 million.

What she does: Before Greiner launched her first product, an earring organiser, to the market, she did her own market research. She didn’t just rely on family and frieds to give her feedback. She went to all different neighborhoods and showed a prototype to people on the street. Then, she asked them to fill out a simple, basic questionnaire: Would you buy this? How much would you pay for it? Do you like it? From those responses, she knew that she had a product that she could sell.

Why she thinks this advice is important: Greiner believes that every successful product addresses a need or a pain point. This is why market research is important—because it allows you, the business owner, to understand what your customers want.

What happened: Doing her own market research paid off. Her earring organiser sold out in 4 minutes after showing it in home TV shopping show.

Greiner teaches us that the success of any product or business lies in our understanding of our customers. We cannot offer a product or a solution to their pain point if we don’t understand their problems. Greiner also teaches us that we cannot rely on other people to find out about our customer pain points. To understand what our customers want and need, we need to consistently communicate with them. When we listen to our customers and we find ways to address their concerns through our products and services, then we are likely to retain them, which will help grow our business further.

In my video, “How to find out what customers want,” I share 3 ways on how to find out what your customers want and need—and it all boils down to communicating and listening intently what your customers are saying.

Barbara Corcoran: Take time to have fun

Barbara Corcoran is a real estate mogul, who began her career in 1970s. She co-founded her first real estate company with her then-boyfriend in 1973, and eventually formed The Corcoran Group when they split. In 2001, she sold her business for US$66 million. Her net worth stands at US$80 million.

What she does: Corcoran loves taking vacations and planning for fun. She plans get togethers with friends. And her secret to solving a creativity block? Going out to a great store, going to a museum, or riding her bike in Central Park in New York City where she lives.

Why she thinks this advice is important: Corcoran believes that having fun prevents burnouts. And doing something other than sitting on a desk makes you creative. And even when her busy schedule prevents her from taking a long vacation, getting together with friends gives her a “mental vacation,” that she says has helped her manage stress.

What happened: Her impressive work ethic matched by her ability to keep herself creative has made her one of the most successful women in the USA.

Corcoran describes herself as a very focused business person, which is why she was able to build an empire. But she also recognises the importance of recovering from stressful days by making time for fun—in her words, taking a “mental vacation” that takes her away from work. The key is to acknowledge that business owners are people—we are not robots that can work 24/7 all of the time. And even then, robots and machines need their downtime, too, for maintenance. We need to be in tiptop shape if we want to operate at peak levels, which means we need to make time for rest and recreation, too. 

In my video, “Maximising the best asset in your business,” I explore how business owners can step back from the daily grind but still be able to productive. The key is to rest and to find ways to spark creativity.

Sara Blakely: Start with “Why” and continue to lead with “Why?”

Sara Blakely is known worldwide as the woman behind Spanx, an American intimate apparel company, which she founded in 2000. Her net worth stands at US$1.1 billion.

What she does: When starting out a business, focus on why you set out to do this in the first place. Focus on the personal and professional goals that you wanted to achieve—and what made you desire to be in the business that you are in.

Why she thinks this advice is important: Your desire points to a purpose. And your purpose provides a motivation and a direction to continue on when the going gets tough.

What happened: Sara Blakely is inventor and founder of Spanx—like Greiner, she began her career as an entrepreneur with a single product that she knew would address a customer pain point. In the early stages of Spanx, she acknowledges how difficult it was to find a company that would sell her product. When the going got tough for her, she focuses on her “why” to get her going.

Blakely expresses what we all need to succeed: purpose. Why are we doing what we do? The simple question makes it easy to see whether our decisions, our actions, and even our thoughts contribute towards accomplishing our goals. It also provides us with something to hold on to when things do not go our way.

In my video, “4 traits you need to succeed in business,” I explore why Purpose, one of these 4 traits, is essential for success. Another entrepreneur, Elon Musk, explains how purpose drives his decisions to succeed.

What I like about the advice from the female Sharks is that it gives counsel to business owners in different stages of their entrepreneurial journey, Greiner tells us what we should do before starting a business or before offering a new product or service—begin with the customers in mind by asking them what they need or want. Both Corcoran and Blakely advice on what we can do when things get stressful or difficult—take a breather and hold on to your purpose.  

If you are interested to know more about what a business has to go through when facing exponential growth, you can download the first chapter of the book, ”$20K to $20 Million in 2 Years” absolutely free here. The chapter talks about the differences between a good and a great business and puts out questions that make you consider how you can turn your business from good to great.

Read more >